HADRIANUS JUNIUS

(1511-1575)

One of the highlights of Northern Humanism


JUNIUS, Hadrianus, Batavia. In qua praeter gentis & insulae antiquitatem, originem, decora, mores, aliaque ad eam historiam pertinentia, declaratur quae fuerit vetus Batavia ... (etc.). Leiden, Officina Plantiniana: Franciscus van Raphelengen, 1588. With device on title and some woodcut illustrations.Vellum, 4to. (XX),411, 1 blank pp. - Nice copy.

Euro 1.150


* TB 2727. BM STC Dutch p. 110. Adams J 442. Leiden Imprints p. 56. Haitsma Mulier 263a.

First edition, posthumously published, of the author's main work. It deals essentially with medieval Dutch history and -topography, but it contains an interesting chapter (XVI) "De Hollandiae ingeniis, studiis, & moribus" as well, naming such humanists as Erasmus, Nannius, Crocus, Janus Secundus, Cornelius Valerius, Cornelius Musius, Canter, Adrian VI, a.o. The last three chapters (XXI-XXIII) deal with the Kelts and are interesting from an ethnological- and etymological point of view.

The description of Haarlem is found on pp. 250-260. It contains the first appearance in print of the famous story of the Invention of printing by Laurens Janszoon Coster, on which for centuries the Dutch claim to the priority of this invention was based. - Bigmore-Wyman I, 379, remarking that Junius' statements "have probably given rise to more controversy than any other statement to be found in literary history". The debate between supporters of Coster and those of Gutenberg has indeed raged for more than three centuries which makes the present work a real landmark in the history of printing.



JUNIUS, Hadrianus, Batavia ... (etc.). Dordrecht, (Jacobus Braat for) Vincent Caimax, 1652. With engr. author's portrait and some woodcut ills. Overlapping vellum, 12mo. 676, (8) pp. (incl. final blank). - A handsome copy, a few short passages neatly expurgated (see below).

Euro 460


* Haitsma Mulier-Van der Lem 263 a. Second edition (first 1588) of the author's main work. It deals chiefly with medieval Dutch history and -topography, but it contains also an interesting chapter (XVI) ‘ De Hollandiae ingeniis, studiis, & moribus’ , naming such humanists as Erasmus, Nannius, Crocus, Janus Secundus, Cornelius Valerius, Cornelius Musius, Canter, Adrian VI, a.o. Chapter XVII called ‘De Hollandiae primariis urbibus’ gives rather extensive accounts of the principal Dutch towns, including Amsterdam, Delft, Dordrecht, Gouda, Haarlem, Leyden, Rotterdam and The Hague. The last three chapters (XXI-XXIII) deal with the Kelts and are interesting from an ethnological- and etymological point of view.




JUNIUS, Hadrianus, Animadversorum libri sex... nunc primùm & nati, & in lucem aediti. Eiusdem De coma commentarium... Basel, Michael Isengrin, 1556. With device on title. Mod. h.calf, sm.8vo. (LVI),432 pp.

Euro 1.500


* BM STC German p. 465. Adams J 441. VD 16, J1094. Darling 2643. - First edition of the learned commentaries on a great many subjects pertaining to the literature of the Classics. The 'De Coma' - on the somewhat unusual subject of the human hair - dedicated to the Amsterdam physician Martinus Aedituus, occupies pp. 294-432.

Hadrianus Junius (Adriaen de Jonghe: Hoorn 1511 ­- Middelburg 1575), physician of the town and rector of the Latin School of Haarlem, since 1573 physician of the town of Middelburg, was one of the best-known Dutch Humanists. Lipsius called him the most learned Dutchman after Erasmus. The present work - not mentioned by H. Brugmans in NBW VII,692-94 - displays the author's wide learning.